New report of goods transport in Norway concludes that rail, sea and road transport do not compete with each other

Date: 14, September 2015
The report indicates that five to seven million tons of cargo can be transferred from being transported on the roads to be transported by sea and/or rail transport instead. That is only 2,5% of the total amount.

The report

The report "The Broad Social Analysis of Goods Transport” was on the  04th September 2015 submitted to the Minister of transport in Norway. The report is a part of the work with the “National Transport Plan 2014-2023” which shows that the Government wants to develop a modern transport system, which for example contains that goods must be transported quickly and efficiently[1].  "The Broad Social Analysis of Goods Transport”  was a cooperation between the public enterprises for transport in Norway. The purpose of this report was to establish an updated knowledge base of the work in the transport sector. The aim of the report is to contribute the work for a safer, more environmentally friendly and economically efficient transport of freight. The analysis is based on new data and the report is discussing different scenarios for goods transport in the future.

The report observes that there has been a growth for all types of freight transport, but especially the road transport has strengthened its position as a result of new trade partners in east-Europe and more trade with fresh goods. Every year there are about 270 million tons of goods transported long distance on the roads in Norway. If strong measures are taken, the report indicates that five to seven million tons of freight can be transferred from being transported on the roads to be transported by sea and/or rail transport instead. That is only 2,5% of the total amount. Even though the report is discussing that this growth can be reduced in terms of a safer, more environmentally friendly and economically efficient transport of cargo by introducing additional road tolls and other tax measures and adopt sea – and rail transport. However, the analysis also claims that such a scenario not will be realized because the existing offer of sea and railway transport, do not satisfy the need for delivery at this time.

NLF welcomes the report

Norges lastebileier forbund’s CEO Geir A. Moe, claims that the discussion about transporting more of the freight on sea or railway, or introduce higher taxes, will not make the situation better, neither for the environment, economy or the safety: “Higher taxes on road transport will make the transport on the roads more expensive and logistics solutions for businesses becomes even more complicated. In addition, the increased fees could also lead to an increasing competitive imbalance between Norwegian and foreign actors.  Even greater number of foreign actors on Norwegian roads will have major social challenges as well as increased road safety[2].

The results of the report conclude that rail, sea and road transport not compete with each other, they are rather complementary. "This is what we have been arguing for a long time", says Norges Lastebileier Forbund’s CEO Geir A. Moe.

EU Transport policy

“The transport policy of the EU is very much based on the idea, that more sustainable transport is achieved by moving freight from road to other transport modes.” Comments Søren H Larsen, CEO of Nordic Logistics Association. ”However, we have argued that part of the transport will always be on road, so it is important also to make road transport  more sustainable. This is not always accepted, which we could see during the discussion on allowing larger, more efficient and cleaner lorries on the roads of the EU. This new report from the Norwegian government supports our view. We can move a marginal part of the transport from road til rail, so it is more important than ever to make road transport sustainable – both in terms of climate, environment, social and economically.”

 

The full report can be seen here



[2] Lastebil.no http://www.lastebil.no/Aktuelt/Nyhetsarkiv/2015/Sluttrapport-om-godstransport