German certification of quality and trustworthiness

Date: 28, October 2015
The German Federal Association of Road Haulage, Logistics and Disposal (BGL, Bundesverband Gütekraftverkehr, Logistik und Entsorgung), has presented a certification scheme intended to ensure and enhance quality and security in the transport chain. It is a joint project between BGL, the insurance company Allgemeine Versicherungen AG and Transfrigoroute (a logistics company for temperature-sensitive goods). This means that BGL guarantees the quality and due diligence of their members, recommending only safe and sound transport to transport buyers. The name is yet to be decided on – whether the certification should be called “trusted carrier” or “known transporter” will be seen, but the system should be designed as a database of trusted haulers and road operators.

It is a joint project between BGL, the insurance company Allgemeine Versicherungen AG and Transfrigoroute (a logistics company for temperature-sensitive goods). This means that BGL guarantees the quality and due diligence of their members, recommending only safe and sound transport to transport buyers. The name is yet to be decided on – whether the certification should be called “trusted carrier” or “known transporter” will be seen, but the system should be designed as a database of trusted haulers and road operators.

The registration and certification process will begin early next year, and around Easter the project should be up and running, says Karlheinz Schmidt from BGL. It should also be available to international transports, through the invitation to the members of the International Road Transport Union (IRU) and their members to participate. If this will be attractive to non-German enterprises is yet to be seen, but Schmidt says Polish and Dutch road haulers’ organizations have shown great interest. Only through being a member of BGL or any other member of the IRU can a hauler become entrusted and receive the certificate.

Road transport operators pay 2 euro a month per vehicle and company. Should a road operator use an unregistered vehicle, the transport buyer will receive a 5000 euro compensation, the cost of which will be shared between BGL and the road operator. There is also a committee overseeing the quality of transports and of the goods transported. If a road operator continuously breeches the agreed terms, he can be excluded from the system.

Schmidt says that this is only in the starting phase of the project. After two to three years, if the system seems to work out well, a premium product can be introduced which will include a compensation of 20 000 euro to the transport buyer. It would include a quality certification with more stringent standards and conditions.

The initiative should be attractive to road operators, as it is a proof of their professionality. During the recent years, basic trust and fair conditions have been missing in the business of transports says Thomas Pütter from Nagel Group, a food transport company. Specifically, the point of loading and unloading is a critical point where a lot of goods are being ruined. A quality stamp would ensure proper handling from pickup to delivery adds Pütter.